Why Carb Control Can Help Neuropathy, Fibromyalgia, and Many Forms of Chronic Pain

As a regular reader of our posts, you understand more than most about the importance of controlling carbohydrates in our diets. So today, lets discuss why carb control can help neuropathy, fibromyalgia, and many forms of chronic pain.

healthymeal 300x200 Why Carb Control Can Help Neuropathy, Fibromyalgia, and Many Forms of Chronic PainThere are two forms of carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates include things like refined sugar, which is commonly contained in cookies, cakes, sodas, ice cream, et cetera. You probably also know that these items are forbidden on the NeuropathyDR Diet Plan!

There are also complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates are manly starches like those found in fruits, vegetables, and grains.

The most dangerous part of high carbohydrate consumption is that it simply causes us to gain weight unnecessarily. The mechanism by which this happens is relatively complex.

In a nutshell, high carbohydrate consumption causes our bodies to produce excess insulin. Production of extra insulin actually causes a number of things to occur, but the most important is lowering of blood sugar by driving excess calories into fat cells.

This is how excess carbohydrates in our diet causes us to gain weight, seemingly very rapidly.

Another factor which many patients are unaware of is carrying excess body fat can elevate blood sugars and triglycerides over time. Even mildly elevated blood sugars can cause some of these sugars to attach to protein molecules. This is responsible for making us feel very stiff and sore.

This also makes it more difficult for our bodies to regulate insulin levels.

Of course, this response is dramatically altered in patients who are diabetic, creating all types of dangerous health effects, including eye disease, kidney disease, and of course peripheral neuropathy and other forms of chronic pain.

The good news is, pre-diabetes and borderline diabetes can often be controlled—and sometimes reversed—by improving the quality of diet.

The sooner we spring into action, the better our chances of impacting our current and future health.

There are, however, two circumstances in which higher carbohydrate consumption maybe needed.

Number one, is if you take insulin. If you take insulin, you need to know that changing your diet, and certain dietary supplementation, especially with thiamine or vitamin B1, can influence your blood sugar and insulin requirements. That’s why need to work very carefully with prescribing healthcare professionals.

Also, if you are an athlete in training, you will need to consume more carbohydrates than average. To avoid excess weight gain, avoid overeating, and emphasize the complex carbohydrates, such as those contained in fruit and vegetables, as opposed to simple sugars.

Also try to confine higher carbohydrate consumption to within one hour before, and perhaps after, strenuous physical activity.

For more information, refer to the NeuropathyDR Diet Plan. In case you missed it, you can find it Here.

Join the conversation on Facebook, and share your food ideas in Reception Room!

Why Carb Control Can Help Neuropathy, Fibromyalgia, and Many Forms of Chronic Pain is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

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What About Tumeric?

Tumeric  is a spice derived from the roots of the plant Curcurma longa. Curcurma is a flowering plant related to Ginger. It is used in cooking in some cultures and has been used for it’s medicinal properties as well. We have used a combination of Tumeric as a supplement with enzymes both to aid digestion but also as an anti-inflammatory aid in pain and neuropathy patients for some time.

In practice, our usage is empirical meaning if it seems to help and does not cause significant side effects it’s something else that may enhance pain and neuropathy care. And as you’ll read, we also use it as a digestive aid with enzymes.

Tumeric is a major component in curry powder. As you may know, some incredibly fun and healthy foods are made using curry. Just like too much curry can cause belly issues so can too much tumeric.

What Are The Possible Health Effects of Turmeric?
Here is some data from NCCIH

  • Claims that curcuminoids found in turmeric help to reduce inflammation aren’t supported by strong studies.
  • Preliminary studies found that curcuminoids may
    • Reduce the number of heart attacks bypass patients had after surgery
    • Control knee pain from osteoarthritis as well as ibuprofen did
    • Reduce the skin irritation that often occurs after radiation treatments for breast cancer.
  • Other preliminary studies in people have looked at curcumin, a type of curcuminoid, for different cancers, colitis, diabetes, surgical pain, and as an ingredient in mouthwash for reducing plaque.
  • The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) has studied curcumin for Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and prostate and colon cancer.Cognitune.com is another great resource we really like for more information on tumeric curcurmin benefits too.  Check it out and I’m sure you’ll agree.One final caution. Don’t mix supplements of any kind with drugs as so little is known about potential interactions. As always, be sure your physicians know what for, and why you may be using tumeric, cucurmin or any supplement or diets.

    Here is the Phyto-Curcurmin we have used for years in pain and neuropathy patients, and also as a digestive aid  with great results.Let us know your experience in Reception Room or here on Facebook!

 

 

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What About Turmeric?

Turmeric  is a spice derived from the roots of the plant Curcurma longa. Curcurma is a flowering plant related to Ginger. It is used in cooking in some cultures and has been used for it’s medicinal properties as well. We have used a combination of Turmeric as a supplement with enzymes both to aid digestion but also as an anti-inflammatory aid in pain and neuropathy patients for some time.

In practice, our usage is empirical meaning if it seems to help and does not cause significant side effects it’s something else that may enhance pain and neuropathy care. And as you’ll read, we also use it as a digestive aid with enzymes.

Turmeric is a major component in curry powder. As you may know, some incredibly fun and healthy foods are made using curry. Just like too much curry can cause belly issues so can too much turmeric.

What Are The Possible Health Effects of Turmeric?
Here is some data from NCCIH

  • Claims that curcuminoids found in turmeric help to reduce inflammation aren’t supported by strong studies.
  • Preliminary studies found that curcuminoids may
    • Reduce the number of heart attacks bypass patients had after surgery
    • Control knee pain from osteoarthritis as well as ibuprofen did
    • Reduce the skin irritation that often occurs after radiation treatments for breast cancer.
  • Other preliminary studies in people have looked at curcumin, a type of curcuminoid, for different cancers, colitis, diabetes, surgical pain, and as an ingredient in mouthwash for reducing plaque.
  • The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) has studied curcumin for Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and prostate and colon cancer.Cognitune.com is another great resource we really like for more information on turmeric curcurmin benefits too.  Check it out and I’m sure you’ll agree.One final caution. Don’t mix supplements of any kind with drugs as so little is known about potential interactions. As always, be sure your physicians know what for, and why you may be using turmeric, cucurmin or any supplement or diets.Here is the Phyto-Curcurmin we have used for years in pain and neuropathy patients, and also as a digestive aid  with great results.Let us know your experience in Reception Room or here on Facebook!

 

 

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Healthy Goal Setting for the New Year

Healthy Goal Setting Can Be Hard

Have you ever started the New Year with a healthy goal and then fallen flat of your face? Well guess what, so have millions…billions of others all around the world. In fact, we all want to have the best expectations of ourselves, but too often, stress and the work load of life get in our way.

Sometimes we think stress and such are preventing us from getting where we want to go. In fact, the blatant truth is, we are what gets in the way.

You might wonder what in the crap we mean saying that we are our own worst problem. The fact is, that can be a hard pill to swallow sometimes. But, the fact remains, that’s the truth.

In order to achieve, be the best we can be and accomplish our goals (whatever they may be), we have to take care of the front lines first. That means US!

Your ability to care for yourself, plan your path and stay the course is what determines whether you will achieve that New Year healthy goal.

So, what’s the best way to make sure you are caring for yourself correctly? That’s the first step. That is to say, without good self-care, the path and what you do with it don’t really matter.

Helping you take excellent care of the whole you is just one of the things that we excel at here at neuropathyDR.com. Furthermore, our team thrives on helping our readers and our patients to be the best they can be. Those who suffer with neuropathy and chronic pain sometimes strive just to make it through the day. So, how do we control pain and move to being our best?

Using healthy goal setting is the way to start. Here are just a few ideas that our patients have shown success with. Take a look at some of our recommendations and try one out for yourself. Fulfilling healthy goals will begin to help your pain.

Healthy Goals and Pain

The truth is, whether you suffer with:

  • peripheral neuropathy
  • chronic pain due to arthritis
  • chemotherapy induced neuropathy
  • diabetic neuropathy

You can improve that number one healthy goal and gain better control of your pain and symptoms.

Some of the best ways are to use a holistic approach to your own self-care. Furthermore, through practices such as nutritional health, relaxation measures and healthy, but appropriate exercises, you can meet those healthy goals for the New Year. You can accomplish whatever it is you are seeking.

Check out some of our earlier information on nutritional health here.

Whatever your healthy goal setting holds for the New Year, it’s always helpful to have support. Join us over on Facebook to learn more and ask any questions you may have. We’ll see you there!

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Allithiamine – Help Your Pain and Your Brain

If you are ready to help your pain, then we’d like for you to meet allithiamine. You may be saying to yourself right now, “what in the heck is allithiamine?” Well, that’s a good question because this is not a word you hear everyday. However, if you would like to help your pain and your brain, this is something you want to learn about.

Allithiamine is a fat-soluble form of the popular B-1 vitamin. The difference is the B-1 you typically buy and hear about is water soluble. Our supplemental allithiamine is fat soluble. That makes a lot of difference in what it can do for your body.

Water soluble vitamins are only partially absorbed and then excreted in the urine. They do not stay around in the body for very long. Fat soluble vitamins, however, hang around in the body much longer and are able to have greater effects. This can be a valuable asset to patients suffering with an unhealthy nervous system and suffering with deficiency symptoms. If you are interested in feeling better and learning to help your pain, keep reading.

Allithiamine occurs naturally in foods of the allium family. Specifically, those include onions, garlic, and leeks. These foods have long been known to be beneficial to your health. Sometimes it can be hard to eat enough of the correct foods to help your pain and nervous system. This supplement form is often suggested for patients whose intake of B-1 sources is insufficient or  if the water soluble form is not providing the expected benefits. If you’re deficient this is a great product for helping you raise your B-1 level. It really can help your pain and improve mental clarity.

But, that bears the question…

Why Is Your Allithiamine Low?

So, why might your B-1 levels be low? There are many reasons this can occur. Here are just a few examples:

    • High carbohydrate intake – B-1 is used to metabolize these.
    • Chronic alcohol use
    • Hyperthyroidism
    • Severe infection
    • Eating a lot of processed foods
    • Many medications
    • Increasing age

As you see there are many reasons. This only scratches the surface of the causes.

Can Allithiamine Help Your Pain AND Your Brain?

A lot of times, doctors and nutritionists will recommend trying to raise your levels naturally at first. This is always best practice, of course. Besides the allium family, other foods high in thiamine consist of nuts, oats, dried beans and peas, asparagus, kale, spinach, broccoli, liver, and eggs. There are more, but this is a good list to get started with.

These foods may help to raise your B-1, but in some cases that is not enough. That’s when supplements may come into play. The benefits of supplementation when needed can be:

  • Improved nervous system health
  • Improved brain health
  • Increased energy levels
  • Improved peripheral neuropathy symptoms
  • Decreased leg cramps
  • Improved depression, anxiety, confusion

And the list could go on and on.

What Can You Do About B-1 Deficiency? How Do You Help Your Pain And Your Brain?

If you think you may suffer with or have been told you do have a thiamine (B-1) deficiency, we advise you to speak to us about allithiamine. This is a supplement proven to help many who have taken it. It is fat soluble and therefore, stays in your body longer.

The oral and topical formulas we suggest are in the store here for your reference and in case you would like to purchase. Just so you know these formulas are free of wheat, corn, soy, yeast and phenol which are common food and chemical allergens.

As with any supplement be sure to check with your physicians before beginning. Patients with active cancer or history of cancer or pregnant should always check with their doctors before beginning any new vitamins or treatment regimens especially allithiamine.

If you’d like to, please join us over on our Facebook page where we share varied information. We’d love to hear from you.

 

 

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Neuropathy Nutrition

One main factor in many cases of peripheral neuropathy is diet.  You probably know that neuropathy is linked to diabetes and other conditions where daily intake of sugars and nutrients is important, but your diet can also influence the condition of nerves in more direct ways, such as in cases where a nutritional deficiency is causing neuropathic damage. We call this Neuropathy Nutrition.

Perhaps the most common links between neuropathy and nutrition is a deficiency in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12.  Fight neuropathy by eating foods that are all high in B vitamins.  If you are a vegetarian or vegan, don’t worry!  There are plant foods that contain substantial amounts of B-12 (GREAT Reference HERE).

Vegetables are high in nutrients that have been shown to be effective treating neuropathy.  Additionally, if you suffer from diabetes, fresh produce can mellow your blood sugar levels.  If numbness or pain in your extremities is severe, keep pre-cut vegetables and limited fruits at the ready, so you don’t have to worry about the stress involved with preparing them! Just be careful of too much fruit sugars. This means a serving is 1/2 apple, banana, etc. Most non-starchy vegetables like greens and asparagus especially are great for most of us.

Foods that are high in Vitamin E are also good for neuropathy nutrition, according to neurology.com.  A deficiency of Vitamin E can happen in cases where malabsorption or malnutrition are taking place, such as the case with alcoholic neuropathy.  Whole grains and nuts are all excellent sources of vitamin E.

Lean proteins are also an important part of a healthy diet for people with neuropathy.  Saturated fats and fried foods increase risk of diabetes and heart disease, in addition to aggravating nerve decay from lack of nutrients. If you suffer from diabetes, lean proteins also help to regulate blood sugar levels.

For some types of neuropathy, research shows that specific antioxidants may help slow or even reverse nerve damage that has not existed for too long a time.  For HIV sensory neuropathy, Acetyl-L-Carnitine has demonstrated good results, and Alpha lipoic acid is being studied for its effects on diabetic nerve damage.  But PLEASE, do not self treat! Get an accurate diagnosis and work with a professional armed with the latest research before beginning any supplementation or treatment, even with antioxidants. Let our team help.

Use Tools Like Journaling and Blood Sugar Monitoring Every Day…

So what are the best ways to monitor what you are neuropathy nutrition?  The easiest way is to make lasting changes it to keep a food journal.  Record everything you eat at meals, for snacks, and any vitamin supplements you might be taking.  Your journal will help you and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determine if your diet could be a factor in your neuropathy symptoms!  As a bonus, food journaling is a great way to be accountable for your overall nutrition, as well as to help avoid dietary-related conditions other than neuropathy.  If you have a goal for weight loss, weight gain, or better overall energy, those are other areas in which keeping a food journal can help!  Other ways to monitor what you eat include cooking at home as opposed to going out to restaurants, keeping a shopping list instead of deciding what groceries to buy at the store, and consulting a qualified NeuropathyDR® clinician about the best ways to meet your specific needs.

Dietary supplements (when properly prescribed and monitored by blood testing) may also help manage neuropathic symptoms and nerve degeneration.  Supplementing with only the highest quality, liquid distilled fish oil can help supply Omega-3 fatty acids, which are crucial for brain and neurologic help. Many other types of supplements can be beneficial if you suffer from neuropathy; consult us directly for specific recommendations.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Patients and Doctors are invited to call us at 781-659-7989 at 12:30 EST Monday, Wednesday and Thursday to talk with the next available senior clinician.

The post Neuropathy Nutrition appeared first on #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatments.

Neuropathy Nutrition

One main factor in many cases of peripheral neuropathy is diet.  You probably know that neuropathy is linked to diabetes and other conditions where daily intake of sugars and nutrients is important, but your diet can also influence the condition of nerves in more direct ways, such as in cases where a nutritional deficiency is causing neuropathic damage. We call this Neuropathy Nutrition.

Perhaps the most common links between neuropathy and nutrition is a deficiency in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12.  Fight neuropathy by eating foods that are all high in B vitamins.  If you are a vegetarian or vegan, don’t worry!  There are plant foods that contain substantial amounts of B-12 (GREAT Reference HERE).

Vegetables are high in nutrients that have been shown to be effective treating neuropathy.  Additionally, if you suffer from diabetes, fresh produce can mellow your blood sugar levels.  If numbness or pain in your extremities is severe, keep pre-cut vegetables and limited fruits at the ready, so you don’t have to worry about the stress involved with preparing them! Just be careful of too much fruit sugars. This means a serving is 1/2 apple, banana, etc. Most non-starchy vegetables like greens and asparagus especially are great for most of us.

Foods that are high in Vitamin E are also good for neuropathy nutrition, according to neurology.com.  A deficiency of Vitamin E can happen in cases where malabsorption or malnutrition are taking place, such as the case with alcoholic neuropathy.  Whole grains and nuts are all excellent sources of vitamin E.

Lean proteins are also an important part of a healthy diet for people with neuropathy.  Saturated fats and fried foods increase risk of diabetes and heart disease, in addition to aggravating nerve decay from lack of nutrients. If you suffer from diabetes, lean proteins also help to regulate blood sugar levels.

For some types of neuropathy, research shows that specific antioxidants may help slow or even reverse nerve damage that has not existed for too long a time.  For HIV sensory neuropathy, Acetyl-L-Carnitine has demonstrated good results, and Alpha lipoic acid is being studied for its effects on diabetic nerve damage.  But PLEASE, do not self treat! Get an accurate diagnosis and work with a professional armed with the latest research before beginning any supplementation or treatment, even with antioxidants. Let our team help.

Use Tools Like Journaling and Blood Sugar Monitoring Every Day…

So what are the best ways to monitor what you are neuropathy nutrition?  The easiest way is to make lasting changes it to keep a food journal.  Record everything you eat at meals, for snacks, and any vitamin supplements you might be taking.  Your journal will help you and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determine if your diet could be a factor in your neuropathy symptoms!  As a bonus, food journaling is a great way to be accountable for your overall nutrition, as well as to help avoid dietary-related conditions other than neuropathy.  If you have a goal for weight loss, weight gain, or better overall energy, those are other areas in which keeping a food journal can help!  Other ways to monitor what you eat include cooking at home as opposed to going out to restaurants, keeping a shopping list instead of deciding what groceries to buy at the store, and consulting a qualified NeuropathyDR® clinician about the best ways to meet your specific needs.

Dietary supplements (when properly prescribed and monitored by blood testing) may also help manage neuropathic symptoms and nerve degeneration.  Supplementing with only the highest quality, liquid distilled fish oil can help supply Omega-3 fatty acids, which are crucial for brain and neurologic help. Many other types of supplements can be beneficial if you suffer from neuropathy; consult us directly for specific recommendations.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Patients and Doctors are invited to call us at 781-659-7989 at 12:30 EST Monday, Wednesday and Thursday to talk with the next available senior clinician.

The post Neuropathy Nutrition appeared first on #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatments.

Is A Neuropathy Cure Possible?

One of the biggest misconceptions is that Neuropathy is just one disorder.

Nothing, and I mean nothing could be further from the truth.

You see, there are so many different things that can induce the various forms of peripheral neuropathy.

The most common form of neuropathy is related to lifestyle and obesity.

This is called metabolic syndrome. As a society we have become larger and less mobile so were seeing many more patients with this affliction.

But that still leaves 50% with neuropathy from other disorders some, indeed very serious and possibly life threatening.

The reality is neuropathy can and does develop from simple things such as a nutrient deficiency like vitamin B12, vitamin D or even cancer.

They’re also significant numbers of patients who have toxic exposures and who develop neuropathy. These toxic exposures could include anything from certain medications to cigarette smoking to occupational exposures.

This of course means your most important first task is to have a thorough evaluation by a professional who truly knows the depth of neuropathy and it’s causes. Unfortunately, too many physicians and therapists are ill informed, in our opinion often not nearly thorough enough.

So is a neuropathy cure possible?

The answer is yes but that of course depends upon what caused it. This also means identifying correctable causes early on is key.

Despite this fact however there are issues that are equally common amongst many forms of neuropathy.

The most important thing that you need to understand is the better care you take of yourself, the better your prognosis.

For most patients this means cleaning up their diets, oftentimes losing a significant amount of weight, eliminating potential neuropathy irritants such as artificial sweeteners and highly refined foods. It also means eating more vegetables and limiting all forms of sugar and sweeteners.

Wherever possible adding exercise, physical therapy, and using the tried-and-true methods of treatment including specialized neural stem and other therapy where available.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Copper: Another Key Neuropathy Nutrient

Most people don’t think about copper as a key nutrient. Or in any way related to peripheral neuropathy or chronic pain. But as you’ll see, a small daily amount is necessary and essential to normal health and well-being.

Only the tiniest amounts are necessary for normal health. But like so many nutrients, lack this tiny amount, and we cannot survive.

In the human body, copper serves several roles. Perhaps the most important are our body’s ability to process oxygen, and absorb iron. Both of these functions are of course essential to life.

We only need approximately 3 mg or so per day to remain healthy. Unfortunately, excess copper more than our bodies can normally dispose of can cause a whole host of health problems, and must be avoided.

The most common source of excess copper in humans is likely from copper plumbing.

Copper levels can be measured in the blood and in the hair.

As we discussed recently, excess zinc supplementation will deplete copper, creating a mineral imbalance and the health problems that go with it. So, excess zinc supplementation will cause a copper deficiency.

This can lead to a host of health problems. There is a syndrome called myeloneuropathy in which copper deficiency causes a B12 deficiency like illness, with damage to the nerves and spinal cord.

Likewise, copper deficiency due to excess zinc, either due to supplements or poisonings like denture cream, can lead to the development of neuropathy too.

One of the key functions of copper is maintenance of normal joint and soft tissue proteins. There is no scientific evidence that copper bracelets and copper socks and the like work for arthritis, even though this was once suggested as a possible cure.

Our NeuropathyDR diet is adequate for normal intake of copper because it is high in nuts and seeds. Additional good sources include olives and avocados. Paleo sources include shellfish, beef, and lamb.

Because copper is essential for normal cellular energy and respiration, a deficiency could aggravate many underlying conditions yes including chronic pain and neuropathy.

Now you know more about this pretty metal!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Zinc and Your Health

As you know, zinc is a metal. It is used in a process applied to preserve metals from corrosion, especially in salt water. This of course is called galvanization. But what you may not know is that zinc also plays a large role in your health, especially neurologic and immune system-related issues.

Zinc and Your Health

Like so many nutrients, balance is everything. Too much zinc will suppress the immune system and cause difficulties with copper levels. Too little zinc can create problems ranging from memory impairment to prostate disease.

Yes, neurologic dysfunction can result when zinc is deficient. According to Hambridge et al in 2007 in “Zinc deficiency a special challenge”, it is stated that zinc is an element with “profound biologic significance”. In fact, zinc deficiencies worldwide are responsible for many disease states.

Perhaps the most important thing to understand is that zinc imbalances are relatively common. This is due both to low levels in foods of modern agriculture as well as elevated levels of copper due to plumbing and environmental sources.

In the clinic, we will measure hair and blood levels of these crucial elements when assessing nutrition status.

In our bodies, zinc can actually act as an antioxidant. This protects us against damage from environmental assaults, as well as natural aging. The presence of zinc is essential for normal nerve function.

It is well-known that zinc can speed the healing process and, in essential amounts, will help stimulate the immune system and possibly prevent prostate disease.

When zinc is used in shampoos and skin lotions, it can act as a sunscreen, a soothing dressing, and also help prevent dandruff.

The reason that zinc is so important is that it participates in many chemical reactions, especially in enzymes.

The recommended dietary allowance for zinc is around 15 mg per day. However modern diets alone sometimes fall short of this.

The good news is, the neuropathy diet that we recommend is high in nuts and seeds which provide relatively good zinc levels. Seafood, shellfish in particular, can be great sources of dietary zinc.

For most patients, safe zinc supplementation level is probably not more than 25 mg per day. More than 50 mg a day could be detrimental. Like so many nutrients, this is one area where working with your neuropathy healthcare professionals is essential if there are any questions at all about appropriate zinc dosages.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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