Allithiamine – Help Your Pain and Your Brain

If you are ready to help your pain, then we’d like for you to meet allithiamine. You may be saying to yourself right now, “what in the heck is allithiamine?” Well, that’s a good question because this is not a word you hear everyday. However, if you would like to help your pain and your brain, this is something you want to learn about.

Allithiamine is a fat-soluble form of the popular B-1 vitamin. The difference is the B-1 you typically buy and hear about is water soluble. Our supplemental allithiamine is fat soluble. That makes a lot of difference in what it can do for your body.

Water soluble vitamins are only partially absorbed and then excreted in the urine. They do not stay around in the body for very long. Fat soluble vitamins, however, hang around in the body much longer and are able to have greater effects. This can be a valuable asset to patients suffering with an unhealthy nervous system and suffering with deficiency symptoms. If you are interested in feeling better and learning to help your pain, keep reading.

Allithiamine occurs naturally in foods of the allium family. Specifically, those include onions, garlic, and leeks. These foods have long been known to be beneficial to your health. Sometimes it can be hard to eat enough of the correct foods to help your pain and nervous system. This supplement form is often suggested for patients whose intake of B-1 sources is insufficient or  if the water soluble form is not providing the expected benefits. If you’re deficient this is a great product for helping you raise your B-1 level. It really can help your pain and improve mental clarity.

But, that bears the question…

Why Is Your Allithiamine Low?

So, why might your B-1 levels be low? There are many reasons this can occur. Here are just a few examples:

    • High carbohydrate intake – B-1 is used to metabolize these.
    • Chronic alcohol use
    • Hyperthyroidism
    • Severe infection
    • Eating a lot of processed foods
    • Many medications
    • Increasing age

As you see there are many reasons. This only scratches the surface of the causes.

Can Allithiamine Help Your Pain AND Your Brain?

A lot of times, doctors and nutritionists will recommend trying to raise your levels naturally at first. This is always best practice, of course. Besides the allium family, other foods high in thiamine consist of nuts, oats, dried beans and peas, asparagus, kale, spinach, broccoli, liver, and eggs. There are more, but this is a good list to get started with.

These foods may help to raise your B-1, but in some cases that is not enough. That’s when supplements may come into play. The benefits of supplementation when needed can be:

  • Improved nervous system health
  • Improved brain health
  • Increased energy levels
  • Improved peripheral neuropathy symptoms
  • Decreased leg cramps
  • Improved depression, anxiety, confusion

And the list could go on and on.

What Can You Do About B-1 Deficiency? How Do You Help Your Pain And Your Brain?

If you think you may suffer with or have been told you do have a thiamine (B-1) deficiency, we advise you to speak to us about allithiamine. This is a supplement proven to help many who have taken it. It is fat soluble and therefore, stays in your body longer.

The oral and topical formulas we suggest are in the store here for your reference and in case you would like to purchase. Just so you know these formulas are free of wheat, corn, soy, yeast and phenol which are common food and chemical allergens.

As with any supplement be sure to check with your physicians before beginning. Patients with active cancer or history of cancer or pregnant should always check with their doctors before beginning any new vitamins or treatment regimens especially allithiamine.

If you’d like to, please join us over on our Facebook page where we share varied information. We’d love to hear from you.

 

 

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Neuropathy Nutrition

One main factor in many cases of peripheral neuropathy is diet.  You probably know that neuropathy is linked to diabetes and other conditions where daily intake of sugars and nutrients is important, but your diet can also influence the condition of nerves in more direct ways, such as in cases where a nutritional deficiency is causing neuropathic damage. We call this Neuropathy Nutrition.

Perhaps the most common links between neuropathy and nutrition is a deficiency in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12.  Fight neuropathy by eating foods that are all high in B vitamins.  If you are a vegetarian or vegan, don’t worry!  There are plant foods that contain substantial amounts of B-12 (GREAT Reference HERE).

Vegetables are high in nutrients that have been shown to be effective treating neuropathy.  Additionally, if you suffer from diabetes, fresh produce can mellow your blood sugar levels.  If numbness or pain in your extremities is severe, keep pre-cut vegetables and limited fruits at the ready, so you don’t have to worry about the stress involved with preparing them! Just be careful of too much fruit sugars. This means a serving is 1/2 apple, banana, etc. Most non-starchy vegetables like greens and asparagus especially are great for most of us.

Foods that are high in Vitamin E are also good for neuropathy nutrition, according to neurology.com.  A deficiency of Vitamin E can happen in cases where malabsorption or malnutrition are taking place, such as the case with alcoholic neuropathy.  Whole grains and nuts are all excellent sources of vitamin E.

Lean proteins are also an important part of a healthy diet for people with neuropathy.  Saturated fats and fried foods increase risk of diabetes and heart disease, in addition to aggravating nerve decay from lack of nutrients. If you suffer from diabetes, lean proteins also help to regulate blood sugar levels.

For some types of neuropathy, research shows that specific antioxidants may help slow or even reverse nerve damage that has not existed for too long a time.  For HIV sensory neuropathy, Acetyl-L-Carnitine has demonstrated good results, and Alpha lipoic acid is being studied for its effects on diabetic nerve damage.  But PLEASE, do not self treat! Get an accurate diagnosis and work with a professional armed with the latest research before beginning any supplementation or treatment, even with antioxidants. Let our team help.

Use Tools Like Journaling and Blood Sugar Monitoring Every Day…

So what are the best ways to monitor what you are neuropathy nutrition?  The easiest way is to make lasting changes it to keep a food journal.  Record everything you eat at meals, for snacks, and any vitamin supplements you might be taking.  Your journal will help you and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determine if your diet could be a factor in your neuropathy symptoms!  As a bonus, food journaling is a great way to be accountable for your overall nutrition, as well as to help avoid dietary-related conditions other than neuropathy.  If you have a goal for weight loss, weight gain, or better overall energy, those are other areas in which keeping a food journal can help!  Other ways to monitor what you eat include cooking at home as opposed to going out to restaurants, keeping a shopping list instead of deciding what groceries to buy at the store, and consulting a qualified NeuropathyDR® clinician about the best ways to meet your specific needs.

Dietary supplements (when properly prescribed and monitored by blood testing) may also help manage neuropathic symptoms and nerve degeneration.  Supplementing with only the highest quality, liquid distilled fish oil can help supply Omega-3 fatty acids, which are crucial for brain and neurologic help. Many other types of supplements can be beneficial if you suffer from neuropathy; consult us directly for specific recommendations.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Patients and Doctors are invited to call us at 781-659-7989 at 12:30 EST Monday, Wednesday and Thursday to talk with the next available senior clinician.

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Neuropathy Nutrition

One main factor in many cases of peripheral neuropathy is diet.  You probably know that neuropathy is linked to diabetes and other conditions where daily intake of sugars and nutrients is important, but your diet can also influence the condition of nerves in more direct ways, such as in cases where a nutritional deficiency is causing neuropathic damage. We call this Neuropathy Nutrition.

Perhaps the most common links between neuropathy and nutrition is a deficiency in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12.  Fight neuropathy by eating foods that are all high in B vitamins.  If you are a vegetarian or vegan, don’t worry!  There are plant foods that contain substantial amounts of B-12 (GREAT Reference HERE).

Vegetables are high in nutrients that have been shown to be effective treating neuropathy.  Additionally, if you suffer from diabetes, fresh produce can mellow your blood sugar levels.  If numbness or pain in your extremities is severe, keep pre-cut vegetables and limited fruits at the ready, so you don’t have to worry about the stress involved with preparing them! Just be careful of too much fruit sugars. This means a serving is 1/2 apple, banana, etc. Most non-starchy vegetables like greens and asparagus especially are great for most of us.

Foods that are high in Vitamin E are also good for neuropathy nutrition, according to neurology.com.  A deficiency of Vitamin E can happen in cases where malabsorption or malnutrition are taking place, such as the case with alcoholic neuropathy.  Whole grains and nuts are all excellent sources of vitamin E.

Lean proteins are also an important part of a healthy diet for people with neuropathy.  Saturated fats and fried foods increase risk of diabetes and heart disease, in addition to aggravating nerve decay from lack of nutrients. If you suffer from diabetes, lean proteins also help to regulate blood sugar levels.

For some types of neuropathy, research shows that specific antioxidants may help slow or even reverse nerve damage that has not existed for too long a time.  For HIV sensory neuropathy, Acetyl-L-Carnitine has demonstrated good results, and Alpha lipoic acid is being studied for its effects on diabetic nerve damage.  But PLEASE, do not self treat! Get an accurate diagnosis and work with a professional armed with the latest research before beginning any supplementation or treatment, even with antioxidants. Let our team help.

Use Tools Like Journaling and Blood Sugar Monitoring Every Day…

So what are the best ways to monitor what you are neuropathy nutrition?  The easiest way is to make lasting changes it to keep a food journal.  Record everything you eat at meals, for snacks, and any vitamin supplements you might be taking.  Your journal will help you and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determine if your diet could be a factor in your neuropathy symptoms!  As a bonus, food journaling is a great way to be accountable for your overall nutrition, as well as to help avoid dietary-related conditions other than neuropathy.  If you have a goal for weight loss, weight gain, or better overall energy, those are other areas in which keeping a food journal can help!  Other ways to monitor what you eat include cooking at home as opposed to going out to restaurants, keeping a shopping list instead of deciding what groceries to buy at the store, and consulting a qualified NeuropathyDR® clinician about the best ways to meet your specific needs.

Dietary supplements (when properly prescribed and monitored by blood testing) may also help manage neuropathic symptoms and nerve degeneration.  Supplementing with only the highest quality, liquid distilled fish oil can help supply Omega-3 fatty acids, which are crucial for brain and neurologic help. Many other types of supplements can be beneficial if you suffer from neuropathy; consult us directly for specific recommendations.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Patients and Doctors are invited to call us at 781-659-7989 at 12:30 EST Monday, Wednesday and Thursday to talk with the next available senior clinician.

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Is A Neuropathy Cure Possible?

One of the biggest misconceptions is that Neuropathy is just one disorder.

Nothing, and I mean nothing could be further from the truth.

You see, there are so many different things that can induce the various forms of peripheral neuropathy.

The most common form of neuropathy is related to lifestyle and obesity.

This is called metabolic syndrome. As a society we have become larger and less mobile so were seeing many more patients with this affliction.

But that still leaves 50% with neuropathy from other disorders some, indeed very serious and possibly life threatening.

The reality is neuropathy can and does develop from simple things such as a nutrient deficiency like vitamin B12, vitamin D or even cancer.

They’re also significant numbers of patients who have toxic exposures and who develop neuropathy. These toxic exposures could include anything from certain medications to cigarette smoking to occupational exposures.

This of course means your most important first task is to have a thorough evaluation by a professional who truly knows the depth of neuropathy and it’s causes. Unfortunately, too many physicians and therapists are ill informed, in our opinion often not nearly thorough enough.

So is a neuropathy cure possible?

The answer is yes but that of course depends upon what caused it. This also means identifying correctable causes early on is key.

Despite this fact however there are issues that are equally common amongst many forms of neuropathy.

The most important thing that you need to understand is the better care you take of yourself, the better your prognosis.

For most patients this means cleaning up their diets, oftentimes losing a significant amount of weight, eliminating potential neuropathy irritants such as artificial sweeteners and highly refined foods. It also means eating more vegetables and limiting all forms of sugar and sweeteners.

Wherever possible adding exercise, physical therapy, and using the tried-and-true methods of treatment including specialized neural stem and other therapy where available.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Copper: Another Key Neuropathy Nutrient

Most people don’t think about copper as a key nutrient. Or in any way related to peripheral neuropathy or chronic pain. But as you’ll see, a small daily amount is necessary and essential to normal health and well-being.

Only the tiniest amounts are necessary for normal health. But like so many nutrients, lack this tiny amount, and we cannot survive.

In the human body, copper serves several roles. Perhaps the most important are our body’s ability to process oxygen, and absorb iron. Both of these functions are of course essential to life.

We only need approximately 3 mg or so per day to remain healthy. Unfortunately, excess copper more than our bodies can normally dispose of can cause a whole host of health problems, and must be avoided.

The most common source of excess copper in humans is likely from copper plumbing.

Copper levels can be measured in the blood and in the hair.

As we discussed recently, excess zinc supplementation will deplete copper, creating a mineral imbalance and the health problems that go with it. So, excess zinc supplementation will cause a copper deficiency.

This can lead to a host of health problems. There is a syndrome called myeloneuropathy in which copper deficiency causes a B12 deficiency like illness, with damage to the nerves and spinal cord.

Likewise, copper deficiency due to excess zinc, either due to supplements or poisonings like denture cream, can lead to the development of neuropathy too.

One of the key functions of copper is maintenance of normal joint and soft tissue proteins. There is no scientific evidence that copper bracelets and copper socks and the like work for arthritis, even though this was once suggested as a possible cure.

Our NeuropathyDR diet is adequate for normal intake of copper because it is high in nuts and seeds. Additional good sources include olives and avocados. Paleo sources include shellfish, beef, and lamb.

Because copper is essential for normal cellular energy and respiration, a deficiency could aggravate many underlying conditions yes including chronic pain and neuropathy.

Now you know more about this pretty metal!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Zinc and Your Health

As you know, zinc is a metal. It is used in a process applied to preserve metals from corrosion, especially in salt water. This of course is called galvanization. But what you may not know is that zinc also plays a large role in your health, especially neurologic and immune system-related issues.

Zinc and Your Health

Like so many nutrients, balance is everything. Too much zinc will suppress the immune system and cause difficulties with copper levels. Too little zinc can create problems ranging from memory impairment to prostate disease.

Yes, neurologic dysfunction can result when zinc is deficient. According to Hambridge et al in 2007 in “Zinc deficiency a special challenge”, it is stated that zinc is an element with “profound biologic significance”. In fact, zinc deficiencies worldwide are responsible for many disease states.

Perhaps the most important thing to understand is that zinc imbalances are relatively common. This is due both to low levels in foods of modern agriculture as well as elevated levels of copper due to plumbing and environmental sources.

In the clinic, we will measure hair and blood levels of these crucial elements when assessing nutrition status.

In our bodies, zinc can actually act as an antioxidant. This protects us against damage from environmental assaults, as well as natural aging. The presence of zinc is essential for normal nerve function.

It is well-known that zinc can speed the healing process and, in essential amounts, will help stimulate the immune system and possibly prevent prostate disease.

When zinc is used in shampoos and skin lotions, it can act as a sunscreen, a soothing dressing, and also help prevent dandruff.

The reason that zinc is so important is that it participates in many chemical reactions, especially in enzymes.

The recommended dietary allowance for zinc is around 15 mg per day. However modern diets alone sometimes fall short of this.

The good news is, the neuropathy diet that we recommend is high in nuts and seeds which provide relatively good zinc levels. Seafood, shellfish in particular, can be great sources of dietary zinc.

For most patients, safe zinc supplementation level is probably not more than 25 mg per day. More than 50 mg a day could be detrimental. Like so many nutrients, this is one area where working with your neuropathy healthcare professionals is essential if there are any questions at all about appropriate zinc dosages.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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It Can’t Be My Diet!

”Why do I feel so lousy all the time?”

Unfortunately we hear this often at our NeuropathyDR clinics. You see, there is a tendency now for people not to prepare or consume fresh foods, especially vegetables. Too often, fast food works its way into our diets.

As for people with peripheral neuropathy and chronic pain, this is like pouring gasoline on fire!

The reason for this is that poor food choices raise blood fats and blood sugars. When blood sugar is increased, some of the sugar molecules tend to attach to proteins; proteins like those that help make up our muscles and skin.

This then leads to aches, stiffness, and quite possibly inflammation. For the peripheral neuropathy sufferer, regardless of the cause, this typically poor diet seems to make it worse.

Increased sugar consumption in addition to aggravating your underlying neuropathy, will cause you to gain weight, lose energy and sleep more poorly.

The good news is however when you make deliberate changes to when and how you are eating, you often times will find yourself feeling better than ever!

So, how do we do this without becoming overwhelmed?

The simplest way to do this is to keep a food diary or record for a week. Keep track of everything you consume. You may be shocked at how much sugar is in things like soda, ice cream, and other things that may have become a staple for your diet.

Like most neuropathy patients, you probably know you should be eating better.

When neuropathy patients write all of this down, changes are much easier for us to help you with.

Always remember, neuropathy is oftentimes a manifestation, or made worse by poor metabolism, secondary to poor diet and lack of enough activity.

Improving both of these can often improve most forms of peripheral neuropathy!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Personal Choices in Obesity Related Neuropathy

Food supply is a doubled edged sword. As little as 50 years ago, foods in some areas of the modern world were in short supply. Modern food processing and even food “manufacturing” has changed all that.

Food itself is far more plentiful for most people than at any time in our history. And that unfortunately has created lots of problems.

Obesity, diabetes and a very common form of peripheral neuropathy are very closely linked. Neuropathy and diabetes are both much more common now a days, and showing up in younger ages than ever before in our modern world.

 

Along with supply, has come a huge increase in the “density” of calories. A calorie is a simple measure of energy potential in what we eat and drink. An average healthy person may only need around 2000 calories per day. But the problem is, its possible to eat (very easily) way more than that, even in 1 meal! Yikes!

So, this means that a cup of a processed food for example can have 3 times the calories and fewer nutrients than a cup of say steamed vegetables, or even lean protein.

And consume these foods long enough before you know it you’ve packed on 20, 40, 60 or more pounds and neuropathy, diabetes and heart disease can and often do result.

Recently, there has been a wave of politicians attempting to legislate better health habits. What a theft of personal choice that is!

Just consider the proposals made by Mayor Bloomberg, and others who wanted to ban sales of certain foods! Quite frankly I’m appalled.

Aren’t we big boys and girls any more? Can we still teach our kids right from wrong? Behavior has consequences!

Real empowerment in neuropathy or any disease comes from the choices you and I make every day. The good news is progress from food companies is being made. Slow, but real.

I’m rather about adults learning what’s best and teaching our children better personal choices every day!

How about you?

I once had the opportunity to interview the famous Hank Cardello, a former food executive and the author of “Stuffed”.

Listen in as Hank and I discuss the Obesity Epidemic and The Food Industry…

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Combatting Nutritional Neuropathy – A Healthy Diet Is Your Best Weapon

If you’ve been diagnosed with neuropathy as a result of[1]

• Diabetes
• Cancer
• Lupus
• Shingles
• Exposure to toxins
• Lyme Disease
• HIV/AIDS
• Repetitive stress injury

We don’t need to tell you how miserable the symptoms can be…

If you

• Take your medication…
• Take precautions to account for muscles weakness or loss of strength in your arms and legs…
• Do whatever your doctor tells you to do and your symptoms still aren’t improving.

In addition to the neuropathy caused by your illness, you could be suffering from nutritional neuropathy.

What Causes Nutritional Neuropathy?

One of the leading causes of nutritional neuropathy is vitamin deficiency, especially Vitamin B12.  If you don’t eat meat, dairy products or even fish, you might not be getting the vitamins you would normally get from those foods.

If, in addition to your underlying illness, you also suffer from

• Anemia
• Gastritis
• Crohn’s disease
• Other chronic digestive problem

Your body is probably not getting the nutrition it needs from what you’re eating.  That can lead to nutritional neuropathy.

Any condition you have that affects your body’s ability to absorb the nutrients and vitamins from your food can lead to nutritional neuropathy.  And that just makes a bad situation worse if you already have some other type of neuropathy caused by one of the illnesses we just mentioned.

How Nutritional Neuropathy Affects Your Body

Even though the name implies that nutritional neuropathy is linked to your digestive system, it can affect much more than that.

Your body runs on what you feed it.  If your body isn’t getting the nutrition it needs, the malnutrition begins to affect every system in your body.  Eventually it affects the peripheral nervous system. The nerves are damaged and no longer function properly.

If your nutritional neuropathy affects your autonomic nervous system, it can lead to problems with blood pressure, an inability to control your bladder or bowels, or even sexual dysfunction.

If your nutritional neuropathy affects your sensory nerves, you can have problems with your sense of touch – not just possibly an inability to feel sensation but a heightened sense of sensation.  Imagine the sheets on your bed feeling like sand paper against your skin.

If your nutritional neuropathy affects your motor nerves, you can lose the ability to control your muscles, you could lose your balance and the muscle cramps you experience from your neuropathy can be even worse.

Even if your neuropathy is being treated with physical therapy or even drug therapies, you still need a healthy diet to give your body what it needs to heal.

If you want to give yourself the best possible chance of avoiding nutritional neuropathy, you need the right diet.

Good Nutrition Can Be Your Secret Weapon

The very first thing you need to do is make sure you’re giving your body the right tools to fight back against nutritional neuropathy.  That means a healthy diet and managing your digestive condition.

Talk to your doctor, preferably a NeuropathyDR® clinician, about all of your underlying medical conditions.  Your diet will not only need to include the vitamins and minerals, but you also need to take into account any digestive problems you may be experiencing that will prevent your body from absorbing the good stuff you put into it.

A healthy diet should include[2]:

• Whole grains and legumes to provide B vitamins to promote nerve health.  Whole grains promote the production of serotonin in the brain and will increase your feeling of well-being.
• Fish and eggs for additional vitamins B12 and B1.
• Green, leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, and other greens) for calcium and magnesium. Both of these nutrients are vital to healthy nerve endings and health nerve impulse transmission and, as an added bonus, they give your immune system a boost.
• Yellow and orange fruits and vegetables (such as squash, carrots, yellow and orange bell peppers, apricots, oranges, etc.) for vitamins A and C to help repair your skin and boost your immune system.
• Sunflower seeds (unsalted), avocados, broccoli, almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, peanuts (unsalted), tomatoes and tomato products, sweet potatoes and fish for vitamin E to promote skin health and ease the pain of nutritional neuropathy.
• Ask your neuropathy specialist for recommendations on a good multivitamin and mineral supplement to fill in any gaps in your nutrition plan.

Foods you should avoid:

• Coffee and other caffeinated drinks.
• Fried foods and all other fatty foods.  Fatty foods suppress the immune system and that’s the last thing you need when you’re fighting nutritional neuropathy.
• Control the amount of animal protein you eat.  High-protein foods elevate the amount of dopamine and norepinephrine which are both tied to high levels of anxiety and stress.
• Avoid drinking alcohol.  Alcohol consumption limits the ability of the liver to remove toxins from the body and can make a bad situation worse.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR™ treatment specialist for a personalized diet plan to help you to help your body to heal with the right nutritional support for nutritional neuropathy and your digestive issues.

We hope this gives you some tips to get started on the road to putting nutritional neuropathy behind you.  Working with your medical team, including your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, to design a nutrition plan tailored to your specific needs is a great place to start.

For more information on recovering from nutritional neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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