Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy

Diabetes and neuropathy nutrition should include a dairy free diet

There is a long-reported link between dairy consumption and the development of type 1 diabetes. Significant numbers of patients with type 1 diabetes can, and do, develop neuropathy.

In one of our recent articles, we spent some substantial time talking about dairy consumption, and its negative effects on human health. As I said previously, these are not popular statements—but so be it.

The fact of the matter is, the scientific evidence is overwhelming. Human beings are probably far better without dairy consumption than with it.

What you may not be aware of is there is a long-reported link between dairy consumption and the development of type 1 diabetes. You may know, significant numbers of patients with type 1 diabetes can, and do, develop neuropathy.

Also, dairy contains insulin-like growth factor which is a promoter of several different cancers, including breast and prostate cancer. Even stronger is the connection between a particular milk sugar called galactose and the development of ovarian cancer.

But more than this, 50% or more of the population has difficulty digesting milk. It is responsible for allergies, indigestion, as well as elevation in cholesterol and so-called “bad” fats.

All politics aside, let’s help the consumer understand the link between milk consumption and health. We often find that patients who do a dairy and gluten-free diet have significant reductions in both pain and inflammation.

Of course, this influences many patients with neuropathy, and, indeed, many forms of chronic pain.

The simplest way to make a dietary shift is to do so gradually. Give yourself time to explore alternatives such as almond, coconut, and rice-based products.

Like everything else, some are far better than others. Be careful of any product with added sugars. Also, many patients find thickeners such as carrageenan to be very irritating to the G.I. tract.

Of course, I encourage you to do your own research—do your homework. Unfortunately, the influence of the dairy industry is very wide. The spillover into classic nutrition, in which I was trained, is also great.

Keep in mind: in a short period of time, you could know more about dairy and human health than your doctor.

So what’s the answer? Share with them. Provide them a copy of The China Study.

Above all, remain diligent to other dietary assaults. They have a tremendous impact upon your health, well-being—and, yes, your neuropathy!

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

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Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin D

Your Neuropathy Nutrition and Diet Should include Vitamin D

Yes, and this essential vitamin has a role in many other disorders too. Vitamin D is a key nutrient, responsible for many essential functions in human body.

What’s the Connection?

Perhaps the most significant functions are maintenance of bone mass and a powerful immune system. The more recent research suggests many additional roles for this key nutrient. We now know that when Vitamin D levels are low, widespread aches and pains plus more illnesses like flus and colds are common.

Yes, and maybe even neuropathy, both directly and indirectly.

Regarding infections, some researchers suggest we should be heading out vitamin D tablets as opposed to flu shots as they probably would be so much more effective, with minimal side effects.

But that’s another story for another time.

The neuropathy Vitamin D connection probably is because Vitamin D is necessary for the body to manufacture some key neurotropic factors.

Neurotropins as they are often called are substances produced by the body to help nerves repair, and whenever possible regenerate.

There are a number different things that can influence your own neurotropin production, including key nutrition components and therapies like low-frequency nerve stimulation.

In fact, the research is so significant here I am “bullish” on neurostimulator kits being tried for most neuropathy and pain patients.

This is why our homecare kits have become a very popular choice and work well the vast majority of the time. If you are new to Beating Neuropathy can find these at NeuropathyDR

So how much vitamin D is enough?

Well, United States says around 600 international units per day is fine, but European countries recommend levels much higher, on the order of a few thousand international units per day for most healthy adults.

So who is correct? I would definitely side with Europeans on this because research supports that most people do not get nearly enough vitamin D either from their diet, or sunlight exposure.

Personally, I recommend a minimum of 2500 units of supplemental Vitamin D per day combined with The NeuropathyDR Diet.

There are unfortunately no good plant sources of active vitamin D. (cholecaliferol).

The best dietary sources of vitamin D come from fish and fish oils.

But the most important advice I will leave you with today is to have your baseline levels of vitamin D checked, you and your healthcare providers must then determine the most optimum dosage for YOU!

Retest after the first 90 days to make sure your body is absorbing this key neuropathy nutrient properly.

You also need to be very careful because vitamin D can be toxic in very large amounts.

To learn more, check back with us frequently as we will update you periodically as the research indicates.

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

 

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Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin B3

Your Neuropathy Nutrition Should include Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, or niacin, is a nutrient that, like all vitamins, is essential to health, life and neuropathy nutrition. Vitamin B3 helps our bodies convert food into energy, burn fat properly, and is largely responsible for helping us feel energized!

Did you know that vitamin B3 is a common ingredient in energy drinks? The reason for this is simple. Without vitamin B3, or niacin, our body is unable to function. For many patients, it is lacking due to poor diet. Consuming a diet high in processed foods is likely to be low in niacin. Consuming alcohol can also lower vitamin B3 levels too.

In the neuropathy clinic, mild deficiencies of niacin are probably relatively common. Mild deficiencies probably show up in the neuropathy clinic as slowed metabolism.

Also very common are low levels of niacin, causing a decrease in tolerance to cold. This occurs in neuropathy and chronic pain patients too!

Niacin deficiency can cause the disease called pellagra. Pellagra is disease characterized by the three D’s: diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia.

In very severe niacin deficiencies, significant changes occur to the nervous system. These changes can show up as psychiatric symptoms and, as we mentioned earlier, dementia or brain disease.

More commonly, especially in modern society, are lower levels of niacin then are optimal, making worse some very common neuropathy treatment conditions, including high cholesterol and metabolic syndrome.

A proper neuropathy nutrition diet should include a good food sources of niacin include chicken, beef, and fish including tuna, salmon, and halibut. Many nuts are also high in niacin. Avocado and shiitake mushrooms are also high in niacin. Vitamin B3 as niacinamide is also a common ingredient in many multivitamins and other dietary supplements.

Since niacin is available in two different common forms (niacin and niacinamide), we recommend patients consume both forms in the same supplement.

The reason for this is they will tend to act somewhat differently, both having beneficial effects.

Measuring vitamin B3 levels requires a little more work than a simple blood test. Blood tests for niacin are often unreliable, so special urine tests need to be performed.

Like so many nutrients, it is important to remember that diet must be the number one method of obtaining proper nutrition. It is also critical to understand that each nutrient is just like a key instrument in a symphony.

And just like a symphony does not work when one instrument does not play properly, the same is true in nutrition–especially with neuropathy nutrition!

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

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Neuropathy Treatment Plan

Make your Neuropathy Treatment Plan Today!

Those who use written neuropathy treatment plans have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

If you or someone you love suffers from peripheral neuropathy, you know how devastating this condition can be. You probably are also aware of the immense life changes a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy can bring.

But the good news is, as you read on these pages repeatedly there is a whole lot you can learn to better deal with your peripheral neuropathy.

This is where having a written neuropathy treatment plan goes along way. In fact you could apply this to almost any illness.

Here’s what to do next:

First of all take out a large piece of paper, or even on mobile phone. Actually, in this stage I am a huge fan of mobile notes sync across all devices.

On your neuropathy treatment plan should first be all your known risk factors. This would include things like cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption, inactivity, and perhaps diabetes. Maybe there are other known factors, such as consumption of medications known to produce peripheral neuropathy.

Once you have your list, then you need to divide it into things that you can change. The very next thing you need to do is to prioritize your neuropathy treatment plan. For example what is having the biggest impact on your health?

This is the very first thing, although perhaps the most difficult that you need to do first.

By first developing a neuropathy treatment plan and then using your own willpower and discipline, along with the help from your family and healthcare professionals, you can do a whole lot to help yourself feel better and function better!

And this really is the entire premise of the Beating Neuropathy family. We are here to help and support you!

What we do know however is those who use written neuropathy treatment plans and not only work off them but share them with their neuropathy treatment specialists have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

To that end, we are here to support you!

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

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Got Diabetic Neuropathy?

Got Diabetic Neuropathy? Let one our our highly trained NeuropathyDR® specialists help you today!

If you have diabetes and you’re experiencing any of these symptoms:

– Diarrhea, nausea and vomiting

– Difficulty swallowing

– Deep pain, especially in your legs and feet

– Loss of sensation and ability to feel warmth or cold

– Muscle cramps

– Numbness, tingling or burning in your arms, hands, legs or feet

– Weakness

– Dizziness, especially when you try to stand up

– Drooping facial muscles

– Loss of bladder control

You could have diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes. Typically, it’s caused by lack of blood flow to the nerves and elevated and uncontrolled blood sugar levels.

If left untreated, diabetic neuropathy can lead to debilitating nerve damage. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should seek treatment with a medical professional with experience in diagnosing and treating diabetic neuropathy like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

If your NeuropathyDR® specialist determines that you have diabetic neuropathy, it’s vital that you start treatment right away.

How Will My NeuropathyDR® Specialist Treat My Diabetic Neuropathy?

The first goal for treatment in diabetic neuropathy is to get your diabetes under control and keep it under control to slow the progression of any nerve damage. That means ensuring that you’re taking any prescribed medications and that you’re eating a diet specific to diabetes control.

A diet specific to diabetes control will include:

– Fresh vegetables

– Fresh fruit

– Lean meats

– High fiber

– Whole grains

– No sweets

Your NeuropathyDR® specialist has an exclusive treatment protocol with proven results for diabetic neuropathy patients. An integral part of that treatment protocol is nutrition counseling and diet planning. Your specialist will sit down with you and plan your meals to include the proper portions of each of these categories on a daily basis to make sure that your blood sugar remains as constant as possible.

Pain Reduction and Nerve Repair

Once you have your blood sugar control, the next part of the treatment protocol for your diabetic neuropathy is taking steps to reduce your symptoms and help the nerves repair themselves. This can be done through a combination of topical pain medications, manual manipulation of the bones and joints to properly align the nervous system and nerve stimulation.

Diet, proper alignment of the bones and muscles and nerve stimulation are all important aspects of successful treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

A Word To The Wise Diabetic Neuropathy Patient

If you are suffering from diabetic neuropathy, pay particular attention to your feet, hands, arms and legs and contact your NeuropathyDR® specialist immediately if you notice any blisters, sores, torn skin, or inflammation. The combination of your diabetes and your diabetic neuropathy can lead to very serious infections that are slow or impossible to heal. This can lead to dire complications that can be avoided if you receive the proper medical treatment early.

Make sure you’re doing a visual inspection and not relying on soreness or pain. Your diabetic neuropathy will impair your ability to feel pain in your extremities and you may not notice the problem until it’s too late for successful treatment.

Assess your current medical situation and take note of any of the symptoms we described. If you are experiencing any of these issues associated with diabetic neuropathy, contact your local NeuropathyDR® and take full advantage of their expertise in the treatment of peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy.

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

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Laser Therapy For Neuropathy Treatment?

Laser therapy could be the “missing link” in some forms of neuropathy treatment!

Laser has been around since about 1960 or so when a now famous scientist produced these “focused light beams” in the laboratory. Lasers have been used in medicine for many years.

These ultra focused light beams can be used at high intensity to seal tissue, aid surgeons dentists and dermatologists in their daily work with patients. And at lower intensity, they have had applications in physical therapy and neuropathy treatment for some time too.

Now, lasers are everywhere, everything from CD Players, printers and measuring devices to military weapons. I’m sure you may even have seen a few of your own!

So what does laser therapy have to do with neuropathy treatment?

Well, it could be that laser therapy is the “missing link” in some forms of neuropathy treatment!

As we discuss together frequently, no neuropathy treatment works 100 percent of the time. And that is a key point to remember. We also have talked about effective neuropathy treatment being the result of working only with highly trained neuropathy treatment professionals.

And nowhere is this more apparent than in laser treatments for neuropathy. Even amongst laser neuropathy treatment experts there’s often is disagreement as to what makes good neuropathy treatment.

But some techniques in laser, neuropathy treatment equipment are looking very promising!

One of our basic attempts when treating neuropathy is to do what ever can help safely and effectively boost your nerve cells use of “energy”.

Well, along with proper nutrition and electrotherapy, laser may aid energy production in damaged nerves.

The way this may happen is fascinating, but way beyond the scope of this column.

But the good news is more experience and research including our own will help us find even better neuropathy treatments than we have available today!

Always remember though, we go to great lengths every day to be sure your NeuropathyDR Clinician is up to date in the latest, and best forms of neuropathy treatment for you and your family!

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

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Do I Have Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes.

If you have diabetes and you have any of these symptoms[1]:

Diarrhea, nausea and vomiting
Difficulty swallowing
Deep pain, especially in your legs and feet
Loss of sensation and ability to feel warmth or cold
Muscle cramps
Numbness, tingling or burning in your arms, hands, legs or feet
Weakness
Dizziness, especially when you try to stand up
Drooping facial muscles
Loss of bladder control

You could have diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes. If left untreated, diabetic neuropathy can lead to serious and possibly permanent nerve damage.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should seek treatment with a medical professional with experience in diagnosing and treating diabetic neuropathy like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

Why Does Diabetes Cause Neuropathy?

If your blood glucose levels aren’t controlled and have been high for significant period of time, the blood vessels that carry oxygen to your nerves can be damaged. Elevated blood glucose can also damage the sheath that covers and protects the nerves. That leaves them vulnerable to damage. Diabetic neuropathy is just the medical term for the nerve damage caused by elevated blood glucose levels.

What Happens to Your Body Once Those Nerves Are Damaged?

Diabetic neuropathy happens when the nervous system is damaged.

If your peripheral nervous system is damaged you can experience[2]

Numbness in your arms, hands, legs and feet
Inability to feel heat, cold or even pain in your arms, hands, legs and feet
Burning or tingling or even the “pins and needles” feeling you get when your legs or arms “go to sleep”
Changes in the shape of your feet caused by weakened muscles
Carpal tunnel syndrome

If your neuropathy affects your autonomic nervous system, you can experience

Digestive problems like nausea, vomiting, constipation or diarrhea
Erectile dysfunction
Irregular heart beat
Loss of bladder control
Inability to regulate your blood pressure

How Can You Reduce Your Risk of Diabetic Neuropathy?

The best defense against diabetic neuropathy is to get and keep your blood sugar under control. Your best bet for doing that is proper diet, strictly monitoring your blood sugar levels and always taking your diabetes medication as prescribed by your doctor.

A good diet for controlling your blood sugar includes:

Fresh fruit and vegetables
Lean meats
High fiber
Whole grains
No sweets

Your NeuropathyDR® Clinician is a specialist has an exclusive treatment protocol with proven results for diabetic neuropathy patients. An integral part of that treatment protocol is nutrition counseling and diet planning. Your specialist will sit down with you and plan your meals to include the proper portions of each of these categories on a daily basis to make sure that your blood sugar remains as constant as possible.

Assess your current medical situation and take note of any of the symptoms we described. If you are experiencing any of these issues associated with diabetic neuropathy, contact your local NeuropathyDR® and take full advantage of their expertise in the treatment of peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy.

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

[1] www.joslin.org/info/diabetic_neuropathy_nerve_damage_an_update.html

[2] http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/peripheralneuropathy/detail_peripheralneuropathy.html

 

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Vitamin B12 and Your Neuropathy

Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause or contribute to the development of peripheral neuropathy.

Vitamin B12 is a key nutrient, which when missing, contributes to, and may actually create a number of different diseases.

Not the least of which is causing or contributing to the development of peripheral neuropathy.

The reason for this is that vitamin B12 is absolutely essential for the normal function of every cell in the brain and nervous system.

Damage to the nervous system caused by vitamin B12 deficiency can actually be permanent and irreversible.

Like so many of the other nutrients we’ve spoken about already, vitamin B12 is also essential for energy production and cellular repair.

B12 is manufactured by bacteria and then ingested by animals. In animals, as well as humans, it undergoes conversion to one or more active forms.

In the autoimmune disease pernicious anemia, a lack of intrinsic factor needed for normal absorption of B12 in the small bowel leads the development of vitamin B12 deficiency—and, possibly, also the diseases that that can cause.

Deficiency of vitamin B12 is also one of the more common deficiencies we see in private practice. When we check with laboratory studies, many adults have inadequate levels.

Signs and symptoms of low vitamin B12 levels are very common and are often passed on as simple fatigue or aging. These symptoms include low energy, fatigue, depression, and memory changes. B12 deficiency in the outpatient setting is probably second only to vitamin D.

Low B12 levels can be due to a combination of diet and a number of different factors. Normal aging is one of these factors; B12 deficiency is much more common in adults over 50.

Some other factors include chronic use of medications that affect the lining of the GI tract, bowel diseases, and actually many prescription medications.

One of the most common reasons for vitamin B12 deficiency in diabetics is the prescription drug metformin.

Like all the key nutrients, it is most important to clearly identify, then attempt to correct a vitamin B12 deficiency.

Eliminating correctable underlying causes such as poor dietary habits and unnecessary drug use are two of the most common ones that I see in my practice—and are two of the easiest fixes.

High dosages of oral supplementation under supervision and/or injection of vitamin B12 may be necessary to correct low levels and frank deficiencies.

Since the effects of vitamin B12 deficiency can be permanent, is very important that you and your doctors take this nutrient and its deficiency very seriously.

This is especially true if you suffer from neuropathy or any neurologic disorder.

So don’t be afraid to ask questions.

I still recommend all adults should routinely have vitamin B12, vitamin D, and folic acid levels checked at every annual physical examination and more often once supplementation has begun.|

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Chronic Pain Answers- Reach Out And Look!

If you suffer from chronic pain the first thing you should do is reach out and look for answers.

As a clinician, the most common problems that present to us in private practice usually involve the skeletal system. For example headaches and low back pain are the two most common chronic pain complaints heard by many primary care and medical practices.

This true for both acute or new health conditions and but especially chronic conditions.

Now I define chronic conditions as those that have lasted more than six months and have not effectively been treated or managed.

One only has to look at television ads and yes even newspapers from over hundreds of years ago to realize there is nothing new or unique here!

Let’s face it- some pains are just part of life. But when chronic pains and other annoying symptoms become long-term and interfere with our quality of live, they can have devastating consequences.

Now obviously, very little can be done about devastating accidents and injuries. Unfortunately this is a real and unpleasant fact. Bad things can and do happen to all of us.

So even though we know that the best way to prevent chronic disabling pain is to treat pain appropriately is from the beginning.

This involves much more than just medication. In fact this is a team effort.

Most of the time pain management should include some type of physical therapy. Physical therapy, chiropractic and other physical therapy is often extremely beneficial especially when applied early on for many types of chronic pain.

This does not mean that chronic pain is not treatable. It just becomes more difficult.

Chronic pain needs to be handled by very experienced physicians and physical therapists. In order to be truly effective long-term, a good portion of this care should include non-drug treatment methods.

And that is in fact what we do every day, all day long in our NeuropathyDR treatment centers.

So if you suffer from chronic pain the first thing you should do is reach out and look for answers.

Don’t take no for an answer until you have left no stone unturned!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Vitamin C is a Key Neuropathy Nutrient

Vitamin C is important to neuropathy patients as is it does help our bodies rid themselves of toxic substances.

Vitamin C is another key player in health and nutrition. In fact, just like Vitamin A which we discussed a few days ago vitamin C is absolutely essential to cell health, replication, and repair.

Perhaps you are already familiar with some of the key functions of vitamin C. You probably know you can shorten recovery times from infections like the flu and colds.

Like vitamin A, vitamin C has a significant role in bolstering our bodies immune system.

But more than this Vitamin C takes part in many key biochemical reactions throughout the entire body. If we consume less vitamin C than we need on a daily basis, our blood vessels can become fragile and our body will begin to break down very quickly.

This was the lessons learned at sea many years ago when sailors developed survey, the Vitamin C deficiency disease.

Vitamin C is absolutely essential for collagen and tissue repair-collagen, is the substance that binds together our skin, and ligaments, muscles, joints etc. This is one of the key reasons that vitamin C applied to the skin can help improve its tone, texture, and resistance to environmental factors.

Just like all nutrients however too much of a good thing is not necessarily better. The maximum amount of vitamin C that should be taken on a daily basis is probably around 2000 mg. and this amount should probably only be continued for a relatively short periods of time. There are of course exceptions, and each patient is different.

This is why you should work with your clinician when formulating your precise nutrition plan.

If you’re following the NeuropathyDR Diet and Lifestyle Plan, it is unlikely that you’ll be deficient vitamin C. The simple reason for this is that you’ll be consuming a fair amount of fresh vegetables and small to moderate amounts of fruits. Many of these are naturally high in vitamin C. The better quality food, the higher the vitamin content.

This is why you must learn to shop wisely and store your food carefully.

Perhaps one of the key reasons that vitamin C is important to neuropathy patients is it does help our bodies rid themselves of toxic substances. These could be anything from natural breakdown products in the body to substances we encounter in our environments.

The net result however is adequate amounts of vitamin C ensure that these critical functions happen, and will help to keep you not only feeling, healing well but also looking your very best!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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